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with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
, who was really clever and remarkable and who is really smart. president johnson, the first president johnson, he is the first one to come up with discrimination. the first time it was ever used in the distinction between race and religion and etc. so by giving it a name and it's starting to have its own life. i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934, roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. the president would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and it was called the state of the union. a lot of these terms were sort of created by presidents -- we think they are from day one. in fact, they are ones that have been added later. and again, some of them are just wonderful. just jumping to a couple, zachary taylor created the term first lady. he applied it to dolly madison but it was the first that anyone had ever used that term. the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was jumping around a little bit and woodrow wilson had potomac fever, which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson, watchful waiti
instead of wanting to be magic johnson, he wants -- >> now the moan is beginning mark. charles schumer of new york, the chairman of the joint committee on inaugural ceremony. >> mr. president, mr. vice president. members of congress, all who are present, and to all who are watching, welcome to the capital and to his celebration of our great democracy. [applause] [cheering] >> this is the 57th inauguration of an american president. and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, it's simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, it's meaning, that sacred yet cautious entrusting of power from we the people to our chosen leader, never fails to make one's heart beat faster as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! [cheering] >> now, we know that we would not be here today where it not for those who stand guard around the world to preserve our freedom. to those in our armed forces, we offer our infinite thanks. for your bravery, your honor, your sacrifice. >> this democracy of ours was forged by intellect argument, by activism and blood. and, above all,
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
will remember -- that magnificent speech, healing speech -- his vice president was ander johnsorew johnson. affusion ticket in 1864 -- a fusion ticket in 1864. johnson arrived with the flu. he gave, for what it was all accounts, a completely inebriated address. lincoln was mortified. it said the public image -- set the public image of andrew johnson. another disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge's. he used that opportunity to state and how the filibuster should be done away with. president roosevelt's second inauguration, that is when the congress started before the president. now presidents and vice presidents began to be sworn outside of the steps. there was one exception in the long tradition of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this is not the opportune time to have endean elaborate inauguration. it
or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i think we saw the president saying, what he's wanted to say for 10 years. and republicans as a result, really back on their heels. republicans now may not get anything from this president in the next three clips. this is not a president who's getting ready to cave or to make a deal with them. starting tomorrow, they're going to try to get back on the offensive. tomorrow, they're going to introduce their bill, vote on their bil
1965 we saw that shift over to the republican party. they say that in 1965 when president johnson signed the voting rights act, he turned to bill morris' aide and said i believe we have lost the south to the republicans for a very long time. so case in point. we have seen that previously conservative element that was part of the democratic south go to the republican party. changing houses. and at the same time the other shift we're seeing is in the implicit nature of intolerance. so previously we saw explicit intolerance in terms of lynches and poll taxes. but today it's about lazy. it's about being shucking and jiving. and in regards to latinos, it's about being illegal. so we're seeing intolerance repackaged and in a new home. >> well, and i think johnson said we've lost it to the south i think it was 20 years he said we're at 28 now. since he said that. but jonathan, when you look at the fact that -- and you wrote about the general powell's warning. when you look back to 2008, the ugly rhetoric had started. listen to this and watch this. >> our opponent is someone who sees amer
vice president andrew johnson's drunken inaugural address. this is about an hour.>> thank you very much. that is a hard act to follow. i will try my best. we are about to have an inauguration on monday. the first question that comes to people's minds often in inauguration as they are standing or sitting in the cold waiting on the ceremonies to begin is we have separation of powers in this country. how is it that the president of the united states is being sworn into office on the steps of the capitol t legislative branch of the government. how did this all come about? it's not in the constitution. if you read the constitution it's sparse. it tells you the date and time the president is to be sworn in and the exact words of the oath but it doesn't say anything else. but yet we have this long two centuries of tradition built up around presidential inaugurations. it comes down to which came first, the chicken or the egg. and the fact is in 1979 when this brand new government was getting started the first part of government to meet was the congress. it was supposed to meet on march 4 but co
. you could argue lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. -- over-interpret the mandate they have been given. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to. mcdonough is seen as an obama an eye on burnishing his legacy. guest: i think the press m
'm carolyn johnson. >> it's good stuff. it's already being called har-bowl. brothers jim and john harbaugh coaching their way into the championship game in new orleans. the 49ers jim harbaugh and his brother, john, haven't spoken to each other about the match up yet. they probably won't, either. we have live coverage for you tonight beginning with abc 7 news larry beil. they're making history here this, is good stuff. >> no talking about it. >> right. >> this is such an unusual situation because it's never happened where before. we've seen the manning brother, peyton and eli playing but never against each other. so brother versus brother is the story here, fans want to explore every little aspect of the har-bowl, two people are tired of this whole thing, jim and john, themselves. they've been brothers so they're used to it. both expressed the same feeling in their minds this is all old news. >> every moment you're talking about myself or john, that is less, less time that the players are going to be talked about. >> fighters are fers, ones playing in the game. you know? they've had the mos
. there were four inaugural balls awaiting them. lyndon johnson made history, after one of the darkest days in america, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. bill clinton ushering more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again, after already making history four years ago. in front of 2 million spectators. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. i'll see you from washington with a special edition tomorrow night. and we'll all see you here on monday. good night.
for dwight eisenhower giant platforms for the invited guests. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. bill clinton ushering more than a second term. ushering the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again since already making history four years ago. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. right here. i'll see you from washington tomorrow night. good night.
. it was considered dangerous. curriculum deviation, i was fired. i was hired shortly after by the johnson administration. [laughter] my favorite worldwide poet happens to be the irish poet. william butler yeats. there are lines many of us learn in school and forget. he said, the best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity. we need that passionate intensity on our side, on the side of the poor children in this earth. i beg the president to summon up the courage to give us that voice. if he does not, it would be a terrible betrayal of his role and he will miss an opportunity to leave behind a beautiful legacy in history. it will be his tragedy as well as ours. [applause] >> we are clearly headed to a real debate about austerity. i do not believe austerity is the answer. some people do. there is a big debate in the coming weeks as we get to this debt ceiling debate. talk to me, from your perspective, about this notion of compassionate conservatism. there was a movement 12 years ago to present that as an alternative. what happened to that? >> i would be glad to g
johnson, was in power. this president has made no secret of his ambition to be the fourth transformative president. and the question is, will he, in his speech today, show a kind of combative nature that led to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're goin
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
was rare. very, very rare. so in lyndon johnson's tenure as majority leader which ended when he was vice president in january of '61, there was one filibuster in his six years. and harry reid's six years, almost 400. that's the contrast. it's gradual. the right to filibuster has been there since the modern senate was there. but it's the perversion of senators that are willing to filibuster anything, any single thing they bring this to bear. >> describe that perversion. >> that perversion is everything from the almost 100 judicial vacancies that you talked about to many examples of recess appointments in the executive branch. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your
debate. >> steve: so will this set the tone for the next four years? peter johnson, jr., 24 hours ago issues we were sit nearing the studio and you were hopeful that the president of the united states would extend the hand -- >> i believe that he would. in fact, a couple people e-mailed me. one woman said i was delusional in that prospect. so what we heard was a hard left manifesto from the president of the united states yesterday at the inauguration. it was not so much about populism as it was about pandering. taas bizarre, disregarded priority of what our national interests were. where was the debt? where was the deficit in where was the unemployment? where was the issue of poverty in america, which has increased under his watch? where is the hopelessness? where is the fear that so many americans have that they're going to lose their house? where are the solutions for those problems? instead, we got this catalog of false premises, phantom arguments in terms of civil rights, in terms of global warming, in terms of long lines at the polls. so if i'm voting for the president in this p
, thank you, from johnson & johnson. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> the bizarre hoax involving manti te'o. listen to this. >> i think as manti tells the story, you'll see the same thing that i saw, that it does fully line up. >> let's talk about it with howard kurtz. also joining us the editor-in-chief of the dailydownload.com, lauren ashburn. there's a problem here because for months and month and months the media bought this story apparently without checking who this woman was. >> this was a feel good story even though it involved a death and it was
, lyndon b. johnson in 1963. james in brandon, florida on our republican line. good morning. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i wanted to ask the country to pray for our president obama -- i am a republican, and i voted republican this year. that was to my commitment to the republican party. i am very disappointed with my party. i do not like the direction they are taking. to be honest with you, i do not like the fact that they are not cooperating in the house or any other place with democrats or with president obama. i would ask the president if he would open upper a new investigation on the 9/11 attacks on this country. i am unsatisfied with the commission report that was put out. host: that was james in brandon, florida. you can see on the capital, five large flags hanging down. the explanation of the five different flags they had hanging down -- this is a congressional report. framed against the black -- the backdrop -- the backdrop of red, white and blue -- we have at ross flag with starch -- stars are arranged in the circle. the next two flags are the flags the u.
tax and repeal the 16th amendment? and go to a fair tax like libertarian gary johnson promoted in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into
tonight, britta. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> the bizarre hoax involving manti te'o. listen to this. >> i think as manti tells the story, you'll see the same thing that i saw, that it does fully line up. >> let's talk about it with howard kurtz. also, joining us, the editor-in-chief of the dailydownload.com, lauren ashburn. there's a problem here because for months and month and months the media bought this story apparently without checking who this woman was. >> this was
controlled senate. you have senators on the democratic side like johnson in south dakota who are not very happy with the sort of president's my way or the highway approach to this legislation. what america needs is a practical president, into the legislative dictator and think senator blunt was spot on. i think there is tension in the democratic party as more goes on with the gun control debate we'll see the tension. >> heather: president had four proposals, universal checks for gun buyers and crackdown on gun buying and a.m. missions on magazines holding more than ten bullets. lindsay graham, republicans in the south carolina he said that he is confident there will be bipartisan opposition to his proposal. even harry reid stopped short of embracing president obama's proposal calling them thoughtful recommendations. is the president's tone contributing to a lack of bipartisanship? >> no. i don't think this is about his tone. i think it is interesting to have a republican senator calling president obama combative given the nature of in congress and how the senate has blocked and pushed the
the inauguration on television. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bullet proof inaugural. ronald reagan's second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the stands. bill clinton ushering in more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. >> i, william jefferson clinton. >> reporter: and president obama with the first lady by his side again after already making history four years ago in front of nearly 2 million spectators. david muir, abc news, washington. >> he'll be the first democrat in more than 75 years to get a majority of the popular vote twice. only five other presidents have done that in all u.s. history. i love the trivia behind inauguration. it's interesting to go back in the file that day. fascinating day for the obamas and for the country. so keep it here on abc news throughout this very big day. we'll be back. ev...direction for my life..... ...through my accomplishments... ...and now, with help... ...and support from my family and others, i own... i own my recovery... ...from addiction and de
tell you, brian, this is -- it's unreal to me. it is unbelievable. as lyndon johnson would say it's like history and fate coming together. for this president, this african-american, to be inaugura inaugurated for a second time on martin luther king day and can look out and see the likeness of martin luther king. to see jefferson, to see lincoln. it is just unreal. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious amer
on the shoulders of people who have been in the white house. president lincoln, kennedy, johnson. the asa stands on the shoulders of the black people who experienced it in the white house. as you noted in your intro, this goes from thosroindividuals who worked to build the white house when washington, d.c., when the country first came into existence, washington dc did not exist. it literally had to be built and it took 10 years. much of that labour from clearing the land, moving the trees and rocks came from african americans and slave labor. the iconic buildings that we know, the capital, the white house, both were built not only by unskilled black labor, people who did just sort of the hard work, but still black labor like carpenters, or african- americans. the first african-american who had engaged in the president's residence whether it was the white house we know now in washington or in the residence of the president george washington when he first went to new york and then when he moved from new york to the president's residence in philadelphia, and both of those residences, washington too
this a great deal, hunting is written about it, simon johnson, a great scholar has written about it and others, that what has happened is one of the reasons we have not clicked as quickly as possible and recovering from the crisis is because the transition mechanism for monetary policy is combed out. think of it as sludge on the motor of your ancient. it's hard to get pistons to move. we provide the fuel to central bank. it has to be transmitted into the economy to me not only have to inducer and sent people to step on the accelerator to create more jobs, that's a matter of having to write laws, regulations, tax incentives and so on, that has to be transmitted through the banking system and the sphinx in such deep trouble in control so much of the asset haven't focused on other things. so they're interfering with the effectiveness of accommodated monetary policy. if you get people to understand this is hurting job creation in the district, think you have more political support. i believe the support is gaining ground. it's not just a question of fairness. it is a question of efficacy and i bel
lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i did not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over interpret. host: let me add, this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monocle and skin. only the second president -- monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post,." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to
. >> steve: joining us is fox news legal analyst peter johnson, jr. we sat in these chairs four years ago. has he kept that promise? >> i think today is a day for new beginning, steve. in some ways he has not kept those promises. this is a at this of great anticipation. it's momentous in our american pageant. it's a day when we say that common ground is the most important part of our lives. common ground, though, means yielding ground. common ground doesn't merely mean allowing people to come sit with you on your side. you need to say, i'm going to give up something in exchange for your participation in the process. i think that's what a lot of americans are hoping for today in this speech. i think a successful inaugural speech is measured by its ability to convince a president's detractors, to convince a president's opponents that they are welcome, that they are part of the process, that they are part of this incredible country. and i hope that he is successful in doing that today on this important day. >> steve: you're not alone. people want stuff done, but if you look at what we've hea
personally have delivered around 5,000 babies. in the 31 years i was in medical practice in johnson city, tennessee, a small town in northeast tennessee, our group had delivered over 25,000 babies. 25,000 children. i see these children now as doctors and lawyers and teachers and sunday school teachers and soccer coaches and housewives, farmers, you name it. bettering our community. i cannot imagine my community without these young people there. they are the future of this great nation. and i've seen this, as dr. harris mentioned, i saw when ultrasound went from when it was just a blob you saw to being able to visionize a heart beat 28 days or less postconception. it's unbelievable to be able to see that and to see this child develop is something that i can't explain to you how fulfilling that is, to be able to see that happen and to have a choice. that is a law we have to get right in this country. and thank goodness minds are changing. . i look around this great room, this great chamber and wonder if choices would be different and members of congress might not be here if a different cho
johnson. that's true. >> anybody compared to bill clinton and lyndon johnson -- not going to change really in that sense. he is who he is. he doesn't want to appear to be inauthentic about it. one of the things about bill clinton was he was what i call an authentic phony. everybody believed what he was saying at the moment. barack obama always had more difficult time trying to act that up. but as he said the other day, you know, he is a nice enough guy. echoed what he said about hillary. nice enough, too. >> that line didn't go over so well the first time. >> he was talking about himself a little easier maybe. >> maybe. but do -- does he enjoy politics? >> yes. well, he enjoys politics but enjoys other things as well. you know, i -- i think that he -- he's learning how to really sort of merge that with the other aspects of what he enjoys which is policy and rest of life. >> can i say two words? joe biden. that's what joe biden is for. he does the things the president really dislikes doing. i mean, it is -- if the president doesn't like to glad hand and hang out with members of congress, th
of war is -- jay johnson, the general kuns counsel of the pentagon, gave a speech about thinking about ending that war. we think about iraq and afghanistan. the hot wars. boots on the grounds wars. the broader framework of war under which we labor through the amf i agree with you the odds are slim that we're going to see a repeal of that, an end to that, but i think it's a place for the conversation to go in the second term as the president headed towards withdrawal with afghanistan and the physical presence we have of u.s. soldiers. >> as we start to understand what an obama foreign policy is. i mean, you look back at the first inaugural just compared with the second inaugural address. the first inaugural address was about ending the era of bush and cheney. that's really what it was about. it was about we're going to do this in i different way. if you unclench your fist. it's a different time now. he has to figure out what he is going to do affirmatively, not in reaction to the way somebody else did it that he disapproved of. >> look at the change in personnel. to go from gates to hil
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)

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